Ben D’Antonio joins the Sequeira Lab as PhD student

Ben D’Antonio has joined the Sequeira lab to undertake an exciting project investigating the vertical and horizontal movements of apex predators at two World Heritage sites in Western Australia. Ben’s PhD work will be embedded in the Gathaagudu Animal Tracking (GAT) ...

Come join our team!

Sequeira lab is currently advertising two fantastic opportunities for Research Associate positions with our lab! We are looking for curious, enthusiastic and self-driven researchers looking to further develop their quantitative skills and expand their horizons through marine animal movement ecology. One position focuses strongly on the analyses of large datasets, computer modelling, and advanced statistics. The other also involves coordinating remote field expeditions to remote areas of the West Australian coastline (Shark Bay) to tag turtles, dugong and sharks.

A trip to Shark Bay kicked off our Gathaagudu Animal Tracking (GAT) Project

We are excited to report back on our first field trip to Shark Bay as part of the Gathaagudu Animal Tracking (GAT) Project. The team of co-CIs Ana Sequeira and Matthew Fraser, and members Takahiro Shimada and Mike Taylor were rewarded in making the 1,600 km round trip from Perth to Denham in Shark Bay with spectacular views and the chance to get to know the stakeholders in that World Heritage Area.

New paper assessing how much tracking data biases affect species distribution models

Dr Ana Sequeira and Dr Malcolm O’Toole have led a newly published paper on tracking marine animals published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution. The study Quantifying effects of tracking data bias on species distribution models used simulation data emulating the movement of marine predators to test the effects of different types of tracking data when developing species distribution models.