Water temperature as a driver of long-distance whale shark migration

The SequeiraLab is happy to announce that the research paper 'Water temperature is a key driver of horizontal and vertical movements of an ocean giant, the whale shark (Rhincondon typus)' led by Lucy Arrowsmith and co-authored by Ana Sequeira, Charitha Pattiaratchi and Mark Meekan, has just been published in the journal Marine Ecology Progress Series!

New paper alert: how DNA can help save threatened sharks

12-October-2021 (written by Jessica Pearce) We are excited to announce that the new review paper "State of shark and ray genomics in an era of extinction" led by our Masters student Jessica Pearce, has just been published in Frontiers in Marine Science! This review discusses how genomics can assist in the conservation of highly threatened …

Our recent standardisation paper makes cover of Methods in Ecology and Evolution!

SequeiraLab is excited to announce that our recent publication led by Ana Sequeira on a standardisation framework for biologging data has made the cover of Methods in Ecology and Evolution! The collaborative project involved more than 40 contributors, including key members of IMOS, AODN, ATN, ONR and OTN, whom came together at the Marine Megafauna Task Team (MMTT) workshop during the OceansOBS'19 conference in Hawaii.

Recent paper published on the growth and energetic requirements of yellowtail kingfish

We are very happy to announce that research led by Callum Donohue and Ana Sequeira has been published in the journal Aquaculture. This research, Bioenergetic growth model for the yellowtail kingfish (Seriola lalandi), provides a mathematical model to predict the energetic requirements and biochemical flux of yellowtail kingfish, a highly valued aquaculture species. This research was conducted during Callum’s placement as a research assistant in the lab under the global Aquaspace project.

New paper assessing how much tracking data biases affect species distribution models

Dr Ana Sequeira and Dr Malcolm O’Toole have led a newly published paper on tracking marine animals published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution. The study Quantifying effects of tracking data bias on species distribution models used simulation data emulating the movement of marine predators to test the effects of different types of tracking data when developing species distribution models.